Corporate mobile messaging gets attention

Corporate mobile messaging is more effective in getting the attention of employees, customers and prospects than email, argues Anurag Lal, CEO of mobile messaging firm Infinite Convergence.

Mobile messaging open rates exceed 99 percent and 90 percent of text messages are read within three minutes of being received, according to a survey by SinglePoint. By contrast, email marketing open rates are well below 50 percent for most industries, according to MailChimp.

"Enterprises are beginning to realize the power of mobile messaging as a means to communicate with their employees, their customers, and their prospects. We are seeing a clear trend where mobile messaging is becoming more mainstream as a means for an enterprise to communicate with those three constituents," Lal tells FierceMobileIT.

The strength of mobile messaging as a communication medium is the speed with which it is delivered and responded to, Lal explains.

According to a survey of 547 mobile phone owners by Infinite Convergence, 91 percent of respondents say they opened a message within 15 minutes of receiving notification of it. The survey also finds that 34.8 percent of mobile phone owners sign up to receive text messages from businesses.

A full 61 percent of mobile phone owners say official information from their employer is the most valuable info for them to receive via text message, followed by store promotions, alerts and loyalty point tracking. Also, 45 percent of mobile phone owners use text messaging for business correspondence.

There is a strong case to be made for the "strength and convenience of mobile messaging when compared to email. I'm not saying email is dead, but clearly messaging has a lot of strength," Lal concludes.

For more:
- see the SinglePoint stats
- check out the MailChip data
- see the Infinite Convergence survey results

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